150 World Leaders To Sign Historic Deal in Paris


The U.N. climate change summit will start Monday in Paris to discuss about cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

The conference, to be attended by nearly 150 world leaders, is likely to produce a historic global agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions causing global warming.

The top three carbon-emitting countries are the United States, China and India. Their leaders will be scheduled to attend the event, which starts on Monday.

The conference, known as COP21, will be a two-week long event. More than 40,000 delegates from 195 countries will be coming to Paris to attend COP21.

Paris, where security is very tight due to terrorist attacks, seems to be not allowing demonstrations because of the security measures. The French government canceled a major march planned by environmental activists in Paris. According to some activists, they will be finding another ways to raise their voices to support this event.

U.S. President Barack Obama will be arriving Paris late Sunday. He will meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Monday. On Sunday, French President Francois Hollande is meeting with several world leaders, including U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and Mr. Xi.

“Clearly, U.S. cooperation with China is absolutely essential to successful efforts to combat climate change,” White House Deputy National Security Advisor Ben Rhodes said in a briefing. “I think the two leaders meeting at the beginning of this process, as the two largest emitters, sends a strong message to the world about their shared commitment to combat climate change and to achieve an ambitious agreement.”

The United States is serious about greenhouse gases, and Mr. Obama already ordered reductions in coal-fired power plants and auto emissions. Another notable step that Mr. Obama took this month to protect environment is rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline, which was designed to supply crude oil from Canada’s tar sands to the U.S. Gulf Coast.

The conference will be held under a state of emergency following the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks in Paris, in which at least 130 people were died.