Solar Impulse 2: World’s 1st Solar-Powered Plane Lands In California After Risky Flight Without Fuel

Solar Impulse
Solar Impulse overflying the Golden Gate bridge in San Francisco, California, United States of America on its way to Muffett Mountainview Airfield. Photo: Copyright Solar Impulse, Jean Revillard: Rezo

SAN FRANCISCO – The Solar Impulse 2 reached California after a completing a very dangerous flight over the Pacific Ocean.

The Solar Impulse is the first solar airplane that can fly day and night without using a drop of fuel. The plane, on a mission to fly around the world without polluting atmosphere, was landed at the Moffett Airfield on April 23 at 11:44 pm local time, completing the crossing of the Pacific Ocean.

Solar ImpulseThe plane took off from Hawaii and its journey to California completed in three days. The 62-hour flight was piloted by Bertrand Piccard. At the airfield, he was welcomed by project’s team, including André Borschberg, who initiated Pacific Crossing in July 2015 after completing a trip from Nagoya to Hawaii in about 118 hours.

According to the Solar Impulse 2‘s project team, the flight from Hawaii to California also broke several world records, which are subject to FAI approval.

The Solar Impulse 2’s journey started from Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates in March 2015. The flight from Hawaii to California was the ninth leg of the Round-The-World Solar Flight that will continue onward to New York, Europe or North Africa and Abu Dhabi.

The Solar Impulse 2 will now move to Phoenix as part of its mission.

“Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg are making history with clean technologies. Their adventure proves that change is possible and that there is reason to hope for a sustainable world. Solar Impulse’s energy efficient solutions can already be used, not only in the air, but also on the ground, and have the potential to change lives, societies and future markets in an unprecedented way,” according to a statement by Solar Impulse.

Photo Credit: Solar Impulse/Flickr