Two Supermassive Black Holes are about to Collide in Virgo Constellation

Astronomers have confirmed that two gigantic black holes are about to smash together in the constellation, Virgo. Scientists who have been following the event found that a pair of closely orbiting black holes is producing a rhythmic flash of light coming from the quasar PG 1302-102.The two supermassive black holes are about to smash into one another.

Scientists have been closely observing the two black holes that are on a collision course earlier this year. The collision is expected to be so massive that it will send a huge burst of gravitational waves through the limits of time- space itself.

Zoltan Haiman, one of the researchers, said in a news release that it is the closest humanity has come to view two black holes on the way to a massive collision.

Haiman added that it would provide a rare opportunity to observe the culmination of the process. It will reveal if black holes and galaxies grow at the same rate. It will also test the basic property of space- time and its ability to carry vibration called gravitational waves that are produced in a final and the most violent stage of the merger.

The center of giant galaxies has in its centre a supermassive black hole. These black holes are so dense that even light cannot escape its massive gravitational force. Over the times, these black holes become bigger by gobbling up stars, galaxies and even other black holes.

The merger or collision of two supermassive black holes can be detected by the flickering of a quasar. Quasar is the signal of light produced by black holes as they burn through gas and dust swirling around them. Most quasars in normal course brighten and dim randomly. However when two black holes approach one another, the quasars flicker at regular intervals.

The findings add a little more knowledge about these black holes. Also, it helps researchers probe gravitational waves, which allows them to test Einstein’s general theory of relativity.